"People come here for the first time and call it paradise; like it's their home away from home."

George Gaitor, Rum Cay

Rum Cay

Known as a “sleeping beauty” because it’s considered one of the best-kept secrets in The Bahamas southern region, Rum Cay is recognized for its historical ruins, vivid coral reefs, miles of pure sand beaches and thrilling surf. Just offshore in the crystal-clear turquoise waters is an abundance of vibrant marine life that attracts fishermen, divers and snorkelers from all around. Rum Cay truly is an authentic Bahamian experience.

What Makes Rum Cay Unique
Rum Cay

Discover more about Rum Cay

In the early days, Rum Cay was home to Arawak Indians. But by the start of the 16th century, after the arrival of Christopher Columbus, a majority of the Indians had left the island. Evidence, such as cave drawings, bowls and utensils, suggest that a small group of them lived in Hartford Cave before departing. By 1901, Rum Cay had five distinct settlements, with a majority of residents calling Port Nelson home. Today, Port Nelson is the only inhabited village remaining on the island. Tourism plays a significant role to island residents, as many of them are employed by the marinas and restaurants that attract seafarers and other visitors.

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Port Nelson

Port Nelson

The street signs in Port Nelson are made in the shape of the island, the only place in The Bahamas where you will see that. The Bahamas' first Governor General, Sir Milo Butler, was born on the island and is remembered by the town square named for him.

Christopher Columbus' 2nd Stop

Christopher Columbus' 2nd Stop

Originally called "Mamana" by the original inhabitants, Rum Cay was renamed "Santa Maria de la Concepción" by Christopher Columbus, who made his second stop here during his voyage to the New World in 1492.

Scenic Distinction

Scenic Distinction

Rolling hills, stunning coral reefs, miles of pure sandy beaches, crystal-clear turquoise waters, exhilarating surf on the north coast—all of these combine to make the island unique and stand out from its sisters with its multiplicity of offerings.

Two Theories. One Name.

Two Theories. One Name.

Two stories abound regarding the origin of the island's name—one says that a West Indian ship wrecked with a cargo of rum during the rum-running 1800s; the other that it was named in honor of the Isle of Rhum in Scotland.

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People-To-People

Bahamians love meeting new people and making friends. When you join our complimentary People-To-People Experience, you'll be paired with a Bahamian ambassador who will ...

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